Charles Benbow

Male 1705 - 1775


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  • Born  Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened  25 Feb 1704/1705  Church of St. Michael, Trefeglwys, Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  25 Jan 1774 - April 1775  Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Charles Benbow was the sixth and youngest child, and fifth son, of his parents, Richard and Susanna Jones Benbow. His father died in 1711, and his mother remarried. Charles and his two older brothers, Gershon and Richard/Benjamin, immigrated to Philadelphia in America in or about 1718, when Charles was about fourteen years old. According to the family legend, he took ship in London, although we have yet to find a record of him as a passenger. This may be due to incomplete or lost or undiscovered records. One version of the story states that he and his brothers ran away from home and were stowaways, hiding themselves until the ship had been at sea for three days. This particular version seems rather unlikely, as the passenger ships were filled with as many passengers as they could carry; and some doubt that two or three young men could have stayed hidden for so long in such tight quarters. It should be noted that this version of the story does not mention brother Richard/Benjamin, but only brother Gershon.

      We do not know why these young men chose to leave home, other than one or more of a combination of reasons, which could include their mother's remarriage, possible conflict between them and their stepfather, and/or little chance of establishing themselves, since they were the youngest sons of the family and would not have inherited any property.

      According to one family story, Charles, having no money with which to pay his passage across the ocean, sold his time while yet in Wales to A.M. Carver, of Pennsylvania, with whom he immediately went to live. Another version of the story states that, upon his arrival in Philadelphia, Charles was bound to a Quaker gentleman named James Carver. Any possible relationship or confusion between this James and the other A.M. Carver is not known, unless A.M. Carver was the father of the four Carver brothers. Gershon was bound to a man from Haddonfield, New Jersey, and he later moved to the Quaker settlement in Goshen, Pennsylvania, where he married in 1726 Sarah Powell, daughter of John Powell, of Trefeglwys, who immigrated in 1722. Richard/Benjamin was bound to a man perhaps from Maryland.

      While Gershon and Charles seem to have maintained contact with each other, as they both settled in Bladen County, NC, in the 1730's, neither one apparently ever saw their brother Richard/Benjamin again; and there is no knowledge what became of him. One family story is that he returned to Wales, but there is no known evidence of his return to his home. Some doubt that Richard/Benjamin made the journey at all, but the Welsh Benbow family seems to accept the story about Richard/Benjamin leaving with Gershon and Charles.

      James Carver apparently left the Philadelphia area with Charles Benbow, whom he had taken as an indentured servant upon Charles' arrival in Philadelphia in 1718, and moved to Maryland, possibly the Baltimore area. James' daughter Mary is said to have been born in Maryland in 1719, but we are lacking proof of this.

      The usual term of indenture was seven years, so it is assumed that, about 1725, James Carver released Charles Benbow from his indentured service, but Charles remained with the family or lived nearby.

      Sometime before May 7, 1738, the date of James Carver's will, Charles Benbow married Mary Carver, daughter of James Carver. It is not known where this marriage took place. One source states the marriage took place in Maryland.

      Before or after the marriage, according to the family legend, James Carver was imprisoned because of his refusal to bear arms. The unpopular pacifist beliefs of the Society of Friends often gave rise to suspicions of secret Tory sympathies, in the years preceding the Revolutionary War. The family tradition states that Charles maneuvered James' escape from jail, by pretending to be drunk and somehow helping James Carver to escape. Charles is said to have gone into a saloon and called for a pint of liquor. After drinking it, he went outside and put his finger down his throat and threw up all the liquor. Then he threw himself down in the straw pen which the law required the saloons to provide for the drunken men to lie in. After the saloon keeper had gone for the night, Charles released his father-in-law, who left for North Carolina. Charles was not suspected because he appeared to be in the pen in a drunken stupor when the grog shop was closed for the night, and he was found lying there the next morning. Charles afterward followed with the family to North Carolina.

      In 1735 James Carver, William Carver, Charles Benbow, and Gershon Benbow obtained patents for land in Bladen County, from the Executive Council and Governor Gabriel Johnson. The land grants were given at the colonial capital of New Bern, about 40 miles northwest of Beaufort, at the southeastern edge of present-day of Craven County, near Carteret County. Charles was granted 640 acres of land in Bladen County on September 9th of that year. Charles, Gershon, and James Carver held adjoining land in Bladen County, where they owned slaves and ran indigo plantations.

      The general story has been that the family went directly to Bladen County. According to Hinshaw's "Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy," Volume I, p. 287, Charles Benbow was granted a certificate at Core Sound Monthly Meeting, NC , in September 1742, when he would have been about 38 years old. "Core Sound Meeting was located in Carteret County, North Carolina, about six miles north of the town of Beaufort," (Hinshaw), close to present-day Morehead City, at the lower end of the Outer Banks. "The jurisdiction of Core Sound Meeting extended over a wide area, including Clubs Foot Meeting in Craven County, Mattamusket Meeting in Hyde County, and Upper and Lower Trent Meetings in Jones County." (Hinshaw) These areas are more than 75 miles away from the Carver's Creek area of Bladen County. It seems apparent that the certificate was for Charles' transfer of his membership from Core Sound Monthly Meeting to Carver's Creek Monthly Meeting, which was established about that time. We do not know if Charles held membership at another meeting in the American colonies prior to this time.

      Charles Benbow's will is dated 1774, and it is filed in the Bladen County Court records, but the date of probate is not known. Therefore, it seems obvious that he spent the remainder of his days on the plantation in Bladen County, and that he died and was buried there. It is possible that some of the fieldstone grave markers at Carver's Creek cemetery are those of Charles and his wife Mary.

      After his death, the children of Charles Benbow chose to move to Orange County, and then to Guilford County - first to the southern part of the county, and then to the northwestern section, where many Quakers lived.
    Person ID  I1  Benbow Family and Allied Lines
    Last Modified  21 Feb 2012 

    Father  Richard Benbow,   b. 1665, Trefeglwys, Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Before 1711, Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Susanna Jane Jones,   c. 01 Jun 1664, Church of St. Michael, Trefeglwys, Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 May 1754, Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  25 Aug 1690  Church of St. Michael, Trefeglwys, Montgomeryshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F1  Group Sheet

    Family  Mary Carver,   b. 15 Jun 1719,   d. 1756-1774, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Before 7 May 1738 
    Children 
     1. Elizabeth Benbow,   b. About 1742, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1825, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Ann Benbow,   b. 19 Aug 1746, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Nov 1832, Dover, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Benjamin Benbow,   b. 1747-1750, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Feb 1829, Guilford County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Sarah Benbow,   b. 1750-1755, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Before 1790, Guilford County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Thomas Benbow,   b. Before 1755, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 Feb 1825, Guilford County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Mary Benbow,   b. 30th day, 1st month, 1756, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10th day, 8th month, 1823, Dover, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Sophia Benbow,   b. 1756, Bladen County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16th day, 7th month, 1821, Guilford County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  29 Apr 2008 
    Family ID  F2  Group Sheet

  • Documents
    Benbow Y-DNA Project - participating line
    Benbow Y-DNA Project - participating line

    Headstones
    Carver's Creek United Methodist Church, Bladen County, NC
    Carver's Creek United Methodist Church, Bladen County, NC
    current church built just behind the site of the old log Quaker meeting house
    Core Sound Meeting Location
    Core Sound Meeting Location
    picture taken from behind current UMC church, looking west towards and past the location of the old Quaker meeting house
    Core Sound Meeting Historical Highway Marker
    Core Sound Meeting Historical Highway Marker
    located on Highway 101, north of Beaufort and east of Cherry Point, Carteret County, NC
    Carver's Creek United Methodist Church, Bladen County, NC, church and cemetery
    Carver's Creek United Methodist Church, Bladen County, NC, church and cemetery
    Carver's Creek United Methodist Church, Bladen County, NC, cemetery
    Carver's Creek United Methodist Church, Bladen County, NC, cemetery
    picture shows an old Quaker fieldstone gravemarker in the foreground


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